Jeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney, Jeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney,Jeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney, Jeremiah has litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  His final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  In addition to practicing law, Jeremiah has served as an adjunct professor at Yale Law School, where he has taught a trial practice class for the past ? years.  Attorney Donovan has consistently been listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York Region.Jeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney, Jeremiah has litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  His final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  In addition to practicing law, Jeremiah has served as an adjunct professor at Yale Law School, where he has taught a trial practice class for the past ? years.  Attorney Donovan has consistently been listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York Region.Jeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney, Jeremiah has litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  His final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  In addition to practicing law, Jeremiah has served as an adjunct professor at Yale Law School, where he has taught a trial practice class for the past ? years.  Attorney Donovan has consistently been listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York Region.Jeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney, Jeremiah has litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  His final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  In addition to practicing law, Jeremiah has served as an adjunct professor at Yale Law School, where he has taught a trial practice class for the past ? years.  Attorney Donovan has consistently been listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York Region.1966-1970 Harvard College.  B.A. magna cum laude with highest honors.  Major: English.  Awarded Master’s Prize for student who made greatest contribution to House; prize for best thesis in English; acted in the Hasty Pudding Show; played freshman lacrosse; and wrote the Kirkland House Christmas Play.  1970-1971 Emmanuel College, Cambridge University.  Lionel de Jersey Harvard scholar.  As holder of the Harvard scholarship, I lived in rooms reputed to have been those of John Harvard, played lacrosse for the university, and participated in a variety of college activities. 1971-1974United States Army.  Was taught  Chinese Mandarin at the Presidio of Monterey, California, and assigned as a translator to the 7th PSYOP Group in Taipei, Taiwan.  While stationed in Taiwan, taught as an instructor in English in the University of Maryland’s overseas campus. 1974-1977 Yale Law School.  J.D.  Editor, Yale Law Journal. 1977-1978Associate, Coudert Brothers, New York, N.Y.  Worked on a variety of different problems, generally involving Asia, for an international law firm.1978-1989Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor,  investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases. 1989-present  Private practice in Old Saybrook, Connecticut.  During this period, litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  Served as a trial practice instructor at the Yale Law School. Our final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  Listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York Region.1966-1970 Harvard College.  B.A. magna cum laude with highest honors.  Major: English.  Awarded Master’s Prize for student who made greatest contribution to House; prize for best thesis in English; acted in the Hasty Pudding Show; played freshman lacrosse; and wrote the Kirkland House Christmas Play.  1970-1971 Emmanuel College, Cambridge University.  Lionel de Jersey Harvard scholar.  As holder of the Harvard scholarship, I lived in rooms reputed to have been those of John Harvard, played lacrosse for the university, and participated in a variety of college activities. 1971-1974United States Army.  Was taught  Chinese Mandarin at the Presidio of Monterey, California, and assigned as a translator to the 7th PSYOP Group in Taipei, Taiwan.  While stationed in Taiwan, taught as an instructor in English in the University of Maryland’s overseas campus. 1974-1977 Yale Law School.  J.D.  Editor, Yale Law Journal. 1977-1978Associate, Coudert Brothers, New York, N.Y.  Worked on a variety of different problems, generally involving Asia, for an international law firm.1978-1989Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor,  investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases. 1989-present  Private practice in Old Saybrook, Connecticut.  During this period, litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  Served as a trial practice instructor at the Yale Law School. Our final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  Listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York Region1966-1970 Harvard College.  B.A. magna cum laude with highest honors.  Major: English.  Awarded Master’s Prize for student who made greatest contribution to House; prize for best thesis in English; acted in the Hasty Pudding Show; played freshman lacrosse; and wrote the Kirkland House Christmas Play.  1970-1971 Emmanuel College, Cambridge University.  Lionel de Jersey Harvard scholar.  As holder of the Harvard scholarship, I lived in rooms reputed to have been those of John Harvard, played lacrosse for the university, and participated in a variety of college activities. 1971-1974United States Army.  Was taught  Chinese Mandarin at the Presidio of Monterey, California, and assigned as a translator to the 7th PSYOP Group in Taipei, Taiwan.  While stationed in Taiwan, taught as an instructor in English in the University of Maryland’s overseas campus. 1974-1977 Yale Law School.  J.D.  Editor, Yale Law Journal. 1977-1978Associate, Coudert Brothers, New York, N.Y.  Worked on a variety of different problems, generally involving Asia, for an international law firm.1978-1989Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor,  investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases. 1989-present  Private practice in Old Saybrook, Connecticut.  During this period, litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  Served as a trial practice instructor at the Yale Law School. Our final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  Listed among the Best Lawyers of Connecticut, Best Lawyers of the United States and Best Lawyers of the New York RegJeremiah Donovan received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1970 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977.   From 1978-1989, Attorney Donovan worked as an Assistant United States Attorney, District of Connecticut.  As a federal prosecutor, he investigated, prosecuted and tried a significant number of criminal cases, involving both violent and white-collar crimes, as well as representing the United States in a variety of civil cases.  In 1989, Attorney Donovan opened the Law Offices of Jeremiah Donovan.  While in private practice as a criminal defense attorney, Jeremiah has litigated a number of significant civil and criminal matters, including United States v. Jackman, 46 F.3d 1240 (2d Cir. 1995) (successfully attacking the method of choosing venirepersons in the district court); Erickson v. Erickson, 246 Conn. 250, 716 A.2d 92 (1998) (reversing the rule followed in Connecticut since colonial times that parole evidence may not be introduced to correct an error in a will); State v. Singh, 259 Conn. 693, 793 A.2d 226 (2002) (the first of a series of Supreme and Appellate Court cases dealing with prosecutorial misconduct); and Keeney v. Town of Old Saybrook, 237 Conn. 135, 676 A.2d 795 (1996) (reversal of state order that town construct a sewerage treatment plant).  His final argument in a federal RICO case is the subject of a literary exegesis in Meyer, “Desperate for Love,” 30 U.S.F.L.REV. 931 (1996).  In addition to practicing law, Jeremiah has served as an adjunct professor at Yale Law School, where he has taught a trial practice class for approximately twenty years.  Attorney Donovan has been listed among the Best Lawyers in America**, most recently in 2013.

Attorney Donovan can be reached at Jeremiah_Donovan@sbcglobal.net

 

* The Super Lawyers selection statistics page of the publisher's website currently can be found at http://www.superlawyers.com/connecticut

* * The Best Lawyers in America selection statistics information is found at http://www.bestlawyers.com/about/MethodologyBasic.aspx

Jeremiah F. Donovan, Esq.​

PRACTICE AREAS

Criminal Law

EDUCATION

Harvard University, B.A.

Yale Law School, J.D.​

BAR ADMISSIONS

​Connecticut

New York​

ASSOCIATIONS & MEMBERSHIPS

​Connecticut Bar Association

American Bar Association

Middlesex County Bar Association​

HONORS & AWARDS

"Super Lawyers CT ", Criminal Law  2013 *